The Best Day Hikes of Washington State, #91-100

The following is a list of top 100 easy hiking trails in Washington state, in order by region and then length of trail.

91. Centennial Trail, Twin Rivers County Park 47.9193, -122.0868

31.3 miles point to point – 8 hrs 52 min – best time to visit: year-round

92. Washington Park Trail, Washington Park 48.4991, -122.6927

2.3 miles loop – 39 min – best time to visit: year-round

93. The Washington Park Arboretum, Washington Park 47.6416, -122.2905

3.5 miles loop – 1 hr – best time to visit: year-round

94. Watershed Park Trail, Watershed Trail Park 47.0285, -122.8891

1.4 miles loop – 24 min – best time to visit: year-round

95. Umtanum Creek Falls Trail, Wenas Wildlife Area 46.8996, -120.6435

1.9 miles out and back – 32 min – takes Discover Pass – best time to visit: May-Oct

96. Whatcom Creek Trail Loop, Whatcom Falls Park 48.7525, -122.4280

4 miles loop – 1 hr 8 min – best time to visit: year-round

97. Whipple Creek Park Loop Trail, Whipple Creek Park 45.7451, -122.6950

2.1 miles loop – 36 min – best time to visit: year-round

98. Bellevue Botanical Park and Wilburton Hill Park, Willburton Hill Park 47.6101, -122.1749

1.9 miles loop – 32 min – best time to visit: year-round

99. Woodard Bay Loop Trail, Woodard Bay Natural Resources Conservation Area 47.1269, -122.8538

2.3 miles loop – 39 min – takes Discover Pass – best time to visit: March-Sept

100. Alki Trail to Hamilton Viewpoint and Seacrest Parks, Alki Beach Park 47.5821, -122.3712

7.6 miles loop – 2 hrs 9 min – best time to visit: year-round

The Best Day Hikes of Washington State, #81-90

The following is a list of top 100 easy hiking trails in Washington state, in order by region and then length of trail.

81. Trillium Trail and Siler’s Mill Trail, Redmond Watershed Preserve 47.6968, -122.0515

4.3 miles loop – 1 hr 13 min – best time to visit: year-round

82. Bowl and Pitcher Loop Trail, Riverside State Park 47.6962, -117.4941

2 miles loop – 34 min – takes Discover Pass – best time to visit: year-round

83. Painted Rocks Nature Trail, Riverside State Park 47.7828, -117.4966

3.3 miles loop – 56 min – takes Discover Pass – best time to visit: March-Nov

84. Trail 25 and Centennial Trail, Riverside State Park 47.7763, -117.5466

3.7 miles loop – 1 hr 3 min – takes Discover Pass – best time to visit: year-round

85. Salmon Creek Trail, Salmon Creek Park 47.4896, -122.3593

5.9 miles loop – 1 hr 40 min – best time to visit: year-round

86. Seward Park Perimeter Loop, Seward Park 47.5499, -122.2577

2.6 miles loop – 44 min – best time to visit: year-round

87. Soaring Eagle Park Trail, Soaring Eagle Regional Park 47.6119, -121.9907

5 miles loop – 1 hr 25 min – best time to visit: year-round

88. Echo Peak Loop Trail, Spring Lake/Lake Desire Park 47.4369, -122.0940

2.4 miles loop – 41 min – best time to visit: year-round

89. Swan Creek Trail, Swan Creek Park 47.2268, -122.3891

3.9 miles loop – 1 hr 6 min – best time to visit: year-round

90. Tradition Lake Loop Trail, Tiger Mountain State Forest 47.5296, -121.9957

3.7 miles loop – 1 hr 3 min – takes Discover Pass – best time to visit: year-round

The Best Day Hikes of Washington State, #71-80

The following is a list of top 100 easy hiking trails in Washington state, in order by region and then length of trail.

71. Marymere Falls Trail, Olympic National Park 48.0581, -123.7889

1.7 miles out and back – 29 min – best time to visit: year-round

72. Marymere Falls Trail from Lake Crescent Lodge, Olympic National Park 48.0581, -123.7889

2 miles out and back – 34 min – best time to visit: April-Oct

73. Staircase Rapids Loop, Olympic National Park 48.057, -123.8000

2.1 miles out and back – 36 min – takes National Park Pass – best time to visit: year-round

74. Devil’s Punchbowl via Spruce Railroad Trail, Olympic National Park 48.0830° N, 123.7877° W

2.4 miles out and back – 41 min – best time to visit: year-round

75. Spruce Nature Trail and Hall of Mosses Loop, Olympic National Park 47.8536, -123.9512

2.9 miles loop – 49 min – takes National Park Pass – best time to visit: April-Oct

76. Hoh River Trail to Mineral Creek Falls, Olympic National Park 47.8597, -123.9337

5.5 miles loop – 1 hr 33 min – best time to visit: year-round

77. Spruce Railroad Trail: Lake Crescent, Olympic National Park 48.0933, -123.8025

11.2 miles loop – 3 hrs 10 min – best time to visit: year-round

78. Trail 121: Waterfall Loop, Palisades Park 47.6672, -117.4876

1.1 miles loop – 19 min – best time to visit: year-round

79. Paradise Valley Conservation Area Trail, Paradise Valley Conseration Area 47.7898, -122.0819

4.6 miles loop – 1 hr 18 min – best time to visit: March-Oct

80. Ellis Cove Trail, Priest Point Park 47.0697, -122.8943

1.5 miles loop – 26 min – best time to visit: March-Oct

The Best Day Hikes of Washington State, #61-70

The following is a list of top 100 easy hiking trails in Washington state, in order by region and then length of trail.

61. Lake Ann Trail, Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest 47.4369, -120.9373

3.4 miles out and back – 58 min – takes Northwest Forest Pass – best time to visit: July-Sept

62. Sheep Lake Trail, Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest 46.8911, -121.5057

5 miles out and back – 1 hr 25 min – takes Northwest Forest Pass – best time to visit: July-Oct

63. Pete Lake, Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest 47.4350, -121.1855

9 miles out and back – 2 hrs 33 min – takes Northwest Forest Pass – best time to visit: May-Nov

64. Lower Big Quilcene to Notch Pass Trail Junction, Olympic National Forest 47.7835, -122.9651

5.6 miles out and back – 1 hr 35 min – takes Northwest Forest Pass – best time to visit: year-round

65. Madison Falls Trail, Olympic National Park 48.0456, -123.5894

0.2 miles out and back – 3 min – best time to visit: year-round

66. Sunrise View Point via High Ridge Nature Trail, Olympic National Park 47.9700, -123.4950

0.9 miles loop – 15 min – takes National Park Pass – best time to visit: June-Oct

67. Quinault Rain Forest Nature Trail, Olympic National Park 47.4602, -123.8614

0.9 miles loop – 15 min – takes Northwest Forest Pass – best time to visit: March-Oct

68. Hoh Rain Forest Hall of Mosses, Olympic National Park 47.8605, -123.9348

1.1 miles loop – 19 min – takes National Park Pass – best time to visit: year-round

69. Cirque Rim to Sunrise View Point Trail, Olympic National Park 47.9700, -123.4950

1.2 miles loop – 20 min – takes National Park Pass – best time to visit: June-Oct

70. Ruby Beach, Olympic National Park 47.7099, -124.4136

1.4 miles loop – 24 min – best time to visit: year-round

The Best Day Hikes of Washington State, #51-60

The following is a list of top 100 easy hiking trails in Washington state, in order by region and then length of trail.

51. Carter Falls, Mount Rainier National Park 46.7662, -121.7927

2.6 miles out and back – 44 min – takes National Parks Pass – best time to visit: year-round

52. Shadow Lakes Trail, Mount Rainier National Park 46.9146, -121.6423

2.6 miles out and back – 44 min – takes National Parks Pass – best time to visit: April-Oct

53. Glacier Vista Loop via Skyline Trail, Mount Rainier National Park 46.7860, -121.7350

2.6 miles out and back – 44 min – takes National Parks Pass – best time to visit: July-Oct

54. Frozen Lake via Sourdough Ridge Trail, Mount Rainier National Park 46.9146, -121.6423

2.9 miles out and back – 49 min – takes National Parks Pass – best time to visit: June-Oct

55. Nisqually Estuary Boardwalk and Twin Barns Trail, Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge 47.0688, -122.7129

4.5 miles out and back – 1 hr 17 min – takes Refuge Entrance Pass – best time to visit: year-round

56. Trail of the Cedars Nature Walk, North Cascades National Park 48.6760, -121.2433

1.9 miles loop – 32 min – best time to visit: year-round

57. Ancient Lake Trail, North Columbia Basin State Wildlife Recreation Area 47.1519, -119.9223

4.6 miles loop – 1 hr 18 min – takes Discover Pass – best time to visit: March-Sept

58. Red Top Lookout Trail, Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest 47.2970, -120.7596

1 mile out and back – 17 min – takes Northwest Forest Pass – best time to visit: June-Oct

59. Rainy Lake Trail, Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest 48.5150, -120.7355

2 miles out and back – 34 min – takes Northwest Forest Pass – best time to visit: July-Oct

60. Old Pipeline Bed Trail, Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest 47.5871, -120.7076

2.4 miles out and back – 41 min – best time to visit: year-round

The Best Day Hikes of Washington State, #41-50

The following is a list of top 100 easy hiking trails in Washington state, in order by region and then length of trail.

41. Franklin Falls Trail, Mount Baker Snoqualmie National Forest 47.4131, -121.4428

2 miles out and back – 34 min – takes Northwest Forest Pass – best time to visit: year-round

42. Barclay Lake Trail, Mount Baker Snoqualmie National Forest 47.7923, -121.4592

4.3 miles out and back – 1 hr 13 min – takes Northwest Forest Pass – best time to visit: May-Oct

43. Greenwater Lakes Trail, Mount Baker Snoqualmie National Forest 47.1059, -121.4751

4.9 miles out and back – 1 hr 23 min – takes Northwest Forest Pass – best time to visit: year-round

44. Pratt River Trail, Mount Baker Snoqualmie National Forest 47.5480, -121.5384

6.5 miles out and back – 1 hr 51 min – takes Northwest Forest Pass – best time to visit: April-Oct

45. John Wayne Pioneer Trail (Snoqualmie Tunnel), Mount Baker Snoqualmie National Forest 47.3930, -121.3928

8.4 miles out and back – 2 hrs 23 min – takes Discover Pass – best time to visit: May-Oct

46. Goldmyer Hot Springs Trail, Mount Baker Snoqualmie National Forest 47.5001, -121.4467

11.1 miles out and back – 3 hrs 9 min – takes Northwest Forest Pass – best time to visit: May-Oct

47. Heather Meadows and Artists Point Trail, Mount Baker Wilderness 48.8498, -121.6849

2.9 miles loop – 49 min – best time to visit: March-Oct

48. Myrtle Falls Viewpoint via Skyline Trail, Mount Rainier National Park 46.7861, -121.7359

0.8 miles loop – 14 min – takes National Park Pass – best time to visit: June-Oct

49. Nisqually Vista Trail, Mount Rainier National Park 46.7848, -121.7415

1.1 miles loop – 19 min – takes National Park Pass – best time to visit: June-Oct

50. Grove of the Patriarchs Nature Trail, Mount Rainier National Park 46.7580, -121.5576

1.2 miles loop – 20 min – takes National Park Pass – best time to visit: May-Sept

The Best Day Hikes of Washington State, #31-40

The following is a list of top 100 easy hiking trails in Washington state, in order by region and then length of trail.

31. Lake to Lake Trail, Red Tape Trail, Palmer Trail to Round Lake Loop, Lacamas Creek Park 47.5935, -122.1156

3.7 miles loop – 1 hr 3 min – best time to visit: year-round

32. Hidden Lake Trail, Lake Wenatchee State Park 47.8216, -120.8064

1.9 miles loop – 32 min – takes Northwest Forest Pass – best time to visit: April-Sept

33. Lake Wenatchee North: Summer Route, Lake Wenatchee State Park 47.8216, -120.8064

2.1 miles loop – 36 min – takes Discover Pass – best time to visit: April-Nov

34. Cherry Creek Falls Trail, Marckworth Forest 47.7457, -121.9076

4.9 miles loop – 1 hr 23 min – best time to visit: year-round

35. Sammamish River Trail, Marymoor Park 47.6152, -122.0655

19 miles out and back – 5 hrs 23 min – best time to visit: year-round

36. Millersylvania Northwest Loop, Millersylvania State Park 46.9113, -122.9113

4.6 miles loop – 5 hrs 23 min – takes Discover Pass – best time to visit: May-Nov

37. Moulton Falls, East Fork of the Lewis River Trail, Moulton Falls Park 45.8326, -122.3918

5.3 miles out and back – 1 hr 30 min – best time to visit: year-round

38. Big Four Ice Caves Trail, Mount Baker National Forest 48.0659, -121.5107

3.2 miles out and back – 1 hr 30 min – takes Northwest Forest Pass – best time to visit: May-Oct

39. Deception Falls Interpretive Trail, Mount Baker Snoqualmie National Forest 47.7146, -121.1934

0.5 miles loop – 9 min – best time to visit: May-Oct

40. Gold Creek Pond Loop, Mount Baker Snoqualmie National Forest 47.4094, -121.3677

1.2 miles loop – 20 min – takes Northwest Forest Pass – best time to visit: June-Oct

The Best Day Hikes of Washington State, #21-30

The following is a list of top 100 easy hiking trails in Washington state, in order by region and then length of trail.

21. Snoqualmie Falls Trail, Fisher Creek Park 47.5437, -121.8370

1.6 miles out and back – 27 min – best time to visit: May-Oct

22. Panther Creek Falls Trail 137, Gifford Pinchot National Forest 45.8674, -121.8263

0.3 miles out and back – 5 min – best time to visit: April-Oct

23. June Lake Trail, Gifford Pinchot National Forest 46.1373, -122.1569

2.5 miles out and back – 43 min – takes Northwest Forest Pass – best time to visit: May-Oct

24. Grand Forest Park Trail, Grand Forest West 47.6504, -122.5479

2.2 miles out and back – 43 min – best time to visit: year-round

25. Granite Falls (Fish Ladder) Trail, Granite Falls, Washington 48.6749, -121.2420

0.7 miles out and back – 12 min – best time to visit: March-Oct

26. Green Lake Trail, Green Lake Park 47.6690, -122.3401

2.8 miles loop – 48 min – best time to visit: year-round

27. Lake Fenwick, Kent, Washington 47.3682, -122.2730

2.7 miles out and back – 46 min – best time to visit: year-round

28. Soos Creek Trail, Kent, Washington 47.3896, -122.1515

11.5 miles out and back – 3 hrs 16 min – best time to visit: year-round

29. Kubota Garden Natural Area Trails, Kubota Garden 47.5128, -122.2657

0.8 miles out and back – 14 min – best time to visit: year-round

30. Woodburn Falls and Round Lake via Lake to Lake Trail, Lacamas Creek Park 45.6039, -122.4071

2.9 miles loop – 49 min – best time to visit: year-round

The Best Day Hikes of Washington State, #11-20

The following is a list of top 100 easy hiking trails in Washington state, in order by region and then length of trail.

11. Coal Creek Trail, Coal Creek Natural Area 47.5542, -122.1666

5.1 miles out and back – 1 hr 27 min – best time to visit: year-round

12. Quinault Loop Trail, Colonel Bob Wilderness 47.4572, -123.7318

3.8 miles out and back – 1 hr 5 min – takes Northwest Forest Pass – best time to visit: year-round

13. Coal Creek Falls loop via Red Town and Cave Hole Trail, Cougar Mountain Regional Wildland Park 47.5348, -122.1288

2.6 miles loop – 44 min – best time to visit: year-round

14. Cave Hole, Coal Creek Falls, Quarry, and Fred’s Railroad Trail Loop, Cougar Mountain Regional Wildland Park 47.5345, -122.1285

3 miles loop – 51 min – best time to visit: May-Oct

15. Cougar Mountain Indian Trail, Cougar Mountain Regional Wildland Park 47.5094817, -122.1161259

3 miles out and back – 51 min – best time to visit: April-Oct

16. Dash Point Trail, Dash Point State Park 47.3183, -122.4074

4.4 miles loop – 1 hr 15 min – best time to visit: year-round

17. Discovery Park and Lighthouse Loop Trail, Discovery Park 47.6576, -122.4065

4.4 miles loop – 1 hr 15 min – best time to visit: May-Dec

18. Dungeness Spit Trail, Dungeness Recreation Area 48.1413, -123.1905

10.2 miles out and back – 2 hrs 53 min – best time to visit: year-round

19. Sequalitchew Creek Trail, Dupont, Washington 47.1064, -122.6472

3 miles out and back – 51 min – best time to visit: March-Oct

20. Blackbird Island Trail, Enhancement Park 47.5939, -120.6627

2 miles loop – 34 min – best time to visit: year-round

The Best Day Hikes of Washington State, #1-10

The following is a list of top 100 easy hiking trails in Washington state, in order by region and then length of trail.

  1. Icicle Gorge Trail, Alpine Lakes Wilderness 47.6086, -120.8945

4.5 miles loop – 1 hr 17 min – takes Northwest Forest Pass – best time to visit: March-Oct

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2. Coyote Loop Trail, Bridle Trails State Park 47.6550, -122.1843

3.6 miles loop – 1 hr 1 min – takes Discover Pass – best time to visit: year-round

large_9bad2a8b66de6cc25bae9f44958ca5cc (1)

3. Rocky Brook Falls, Brinnon, Washington 47.7092, -122.9205

0.3 miles out and back – 5 min – best time to visit: March-Oct

Olympic_Peninsula_223_08232011

4. McLane Creek Woods Trail, Capitol State Forest 47.0008, -123.0042

2.1 miles loop – 36 min – takes Discover Pass – best time to visit: March-Oct

5. Mima Falls East Trail, Capitol State Forest 46.9019, -123.0640

4.7 miles out and back – 1 hr 20 min – takes Discover Pass – best time to visit: year-round

6. Little Mashel Falls Trail via Bud Blancher Trail, Charles L Pack Experimental Forest 46.8647, -122.2576

4.6 miles loop – 1 hr 18 min – best time to visit: year-round

7. Little Mashel Falls Trail, Charles L Pack Experimental Forest 46.8436, -122.3122

5 miles out and back – 1 hr 25 min – best time to visit: March-Oct

8. Clark’s Creek Trail, Clarks Creek Park 47.1806, -122.3161

2.2 miles loop – 37 min – best time to visit: year-round

9. Skookum Flats Trail, Clearwater Wilderness 47.0490, -121.5700

4.3 miles out and back – 1 hr 13 min – takes Northwest Forest Pass – best time to visit: March-Nov

10. Coal Creek and Primrose Trail Loop from Lakemont Blvd, Coal Creek Natural Area 47.5542, -122.1666

3.6 miles out and back – 1 hr 1 min – best time to visit: April-Oct

I Cook and Review Recipes from Cookbooks

Baked fish.

caroline-attwood-301746-unsplash

Yeah right.

This was actually a breaded salmon recipe but the only free photos were of raw fish.

It was a… strange process. This recipe involves these things: eggs, a little milk, crushed Italian-style croutons, Italian seasonings and then lemon wedges and horseradish sauce for toppings.

First, you mix your wet ingredients in a bowl. Eggs, milk, and… well that’s it.

Next, you crush up your croutons with a pastry cutter. Which I have been using A LOT. I used it for crushing butter into flour for biscuits and smashing Fritos. There’s something very satisfying about crushing.

Third, take your crouton crumbs, Italian seasonings, and… well that’s it.

Then this is the weirdest part: you dip the salmon into the egg and milk mixture, and then press the breading into the egg coated salmon. How weird is that?

Then I baked it.

4.5 out of 5 stars. Because I don’t really like fish that much.

 


 

Applesauce bars.

applesauce_bars

It’s a cake.

Look, I don’t like being played for a fool. These, “applesauce bars” are not bars at all. This is a fucking cake.

5 out of 5 stars.

 


 

Freeze-your-own herbed vegetable blend.

frozenvegetables

Now that’s what I’m talking about.

This recipe? 4.5 out of 5 stars. Pretty good, right? Well it’s kind of hard to fuck up putting something in the freezer.

But I did.

The recipe involved a lot of prep. I was cutting vegetables and blanching them. For those of you who aren’t familiar with the cooking term, “cutting,” it’s when you take a knife and with a loose wrist, chop at the vegetable until it’s cut into tiny pieces but not so tiny it’s liquid.

After prepping and blanching the vegetables, I made butter. I mean, I didn’t churn it in one of those wooden buckets with a mop, but I melted a stick of butter or two, (throwing off the lawyers once again, heh heh) and then I added a bunch of herbs and spices to it. I made mine Italian-style. With Italian herbs.

I boiled corn for this.

Then I took the butter and put it in a freezer bag. A small one. And then I put that bag in the freezer for a while. Maybe an hour?

After the butter got more solid and the vegetables were done blanching, I cut the butter into little pats and put them in an even BIGGER freezer bag. I mixed up the pats of butter and the vegetables and then shoved the bags into the freezer.

The only problem is that later when I used these frozen vegetables to eat with some dinner meat, it tasted like there was no salt in anything! So I had to add salt. Not the end of the world, though. People in the world are living in extreme poverty, I can handle adding a little salt to my dinner.

 


 

Angel food cake.

Angel_food_cake_1

This is what an angel food cake is supposed to look like.

4 out of 5 stars.

One thing about this recipe is that it tasted very good. Another thing about this recipe is I waited too long to make the icing and the cake went stale.

This cake involved taking powdered sugar and mixing it with something and I just killed it with my electric mixer. Also powdered sugar went flying everywhere all over the kitchen because I don’t know what I’m doing. It smelled so good though. The final result.

This recipe has only a few ingredients. You probably have them in your house. I can’t say what they are because I might get sued.


 

Eggplant parmigiana.

IMG_0765

I actually did take this picture. It turned out kinda cool, right?

4.5 OUT OF 5 STARS! This almost turned out perfect except for a few snags along the way:

  1. I undercooked the eggplant a little.
  2. The top was browned but the eggplant was not completely cooked in the middle.

But goddamn if it didn’t taste good anyway. The taste makes up for the fact that I ruined it.

Next time I would lower the temperature from 400 degrees to something else. Maybe 350 degrees? 375? I don’t know. I’ll keep trying. I’ll never give up on this. Not now. Not ever.


 

Bean and beef enchilada casserole.

enchiladas

Beautiful lighting.

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars.

This one was pretty good, guys. This recipe had a normal amount of ingredients for an enchilada casserole. And it was pretty easy to make too. Just gently, carefully, and lovingly place the enchiladas in the pan. Then dump that enchilada sauce on top with a lot of cheese.

That’s it. I’ve never been to Mexico but I imagine I’d be pulling a fast one on my host family if I whipped up this sucker for them. They’d be like, “Is this… is this authentic Mexican food?” And I’d be like, “Nope! Just a casserole! Just a bastardization of enchiladas!” Then we’d laugh about it and keep saying, “Come on, you old dog! Pass more enchilada casserole over here!”


 

Bacon and blue cheese biscuits.

Biscuit_which_has_been_broken_open

Don’t put honey on a bacon and blue cheese biscuit. Please. For my family.

This is your basic biscuit recipe but with a twist. Can you guess the twist? It’s adding bacon and blue cheese. That’s the surprise.

All-purpose flour, baking powder, sugar, salt, cream of tartar, butter and milk. But there’s more: bacon. and. blue cheese.

How did it turn out? 1.5 out of 5 stars.

I like the concept. But the application? It tasted like eating a piece of wood. It was dry, dusty, kind of hard, and a beaver was watching me the whole time.

I think the biscuits turned out dry because I followed the directions, which had a range to put them in the oven of 10 minutes to 14 minutes. What the f is with ranges on a recipe? I just want to know how long to cook it for. Don’t make me guess. I am using a recipe. If I wanted to use my cooking intuition, I wouldn’t be using a recipe. Don’t make me think, BH&G!!!

I just touched the biscuits and they weren’t browned like the directions said and I thought they might still be dough-y so I left them in the oven for the full 14 minutes. Amateur chef mistake!

Overall, I would try this recipe again. Maybe if I put them in the oven for only 10 minutes they would have turned out better. Also though, I don’t really like biscuits.


 

Caramel apples.

Caramel_apple_display_(3652153340)

What a disaster but also so good! 4 out of 5 stars. My problem with this recipe: I was bad at it.

Apples, sticks (the grocery store kind, don’t make the same mistake I did), caramels (unwrapped, don’t make the same mistake I did), and whipping cream. And nuts, if you like them like me.

You take the caramels and dump them in the saucepan. Then you put some of the whipping cream in there. Stir it around a lot for a long time over a medium or medium low heat if you have a stove like mine that sucks.

When it’s nice and liquid-y enough, you take your apple, shove a stick up its core, and dip the apple into the caramel sauce.

One little problem though. I couldn’t figure out how to get caramel on the whole thing so I was just kind dipping the apple in there and getting half of it covered and then using the spatula to spoon the caramel over the rest of it. It ended up pretty uneven with some of the caramel not even on the apple and some GIANT blobs of caramel on the other side of the apple.

Also the stick fell out so it was basically just me holding an apple and dipping it in boiling hot caramel trying not to get it on my fingers but I got it on my fingers and it burned me.

It was ok though because I knew it was going to taste like magic. I had chopped some deluxe mixed nuts as finely chopped as I could (which is not a lot), and I rolled the apple in the nuts. Then I set it on a baking sheet with no wax paper because I was out.

Here’s the best part though!! It tasted like the carnival!!

Next time, I would probably get my friend who was a chocolatier to make them for me. That’s the only thing I would do differently if I were to cook it again.


 

Egg casserole.

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Again, not a picture I took, but still looks like the uncooked egg casserole before I put it in the oven. I plan to take pictures when I cook. I just haven’t yet because I didn’t think of the blog post idea until I had already cooked a few of the BH&G recipes.

2.5 out of 5 stars. It turned out fine. But I probably used way too much french bread. Lucky for you though: I like french bread.

This recipe is simple and nice. 7 ingredients: bread cubes, meat, vegetable, 4-6 oz. shredded cheese, 4 eggs, 1 1/2 cups dairy, and then you got your seasoning. The recipe gives more detail about potential options but I’m afraid of being sued so I just kept it nice and vague for the lawyers who are always trying to sue me over my blog.

I made this with bacon, broccoli, cheddar, milk, and some Italian seasoning as my variation options. And it turned out good. But just good.

I’d make it again. But only begrudgingly. I’d do it for my children. (I don’t have any children).

 


 

Black bean-chipotle burgers.

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This is also not a picture I took. It’s a stock photo. But it kind of looks like how the “burgers” turned out.

First of all: 1 out of 5 stars. I have several complaints about this recipe but you should also know: it was just ok to eat and taste.

This recipe requires a lot of ingredients so watch out. One of the little problems I had was that even though I followed the directions EXACTLY, the burger patties flew apart when I put them in the pan and it just kind of… turned into a stir fry.

Which is fine. It still tasted ok. But there was another problem.

I got the tostada shells from the store and they were carefully packaged and then I opened the box and the tostada shells were completely crushed into tortilla chip size! Who did this??

So not only were they not burgers, considering they were supposed to be in a tostada shell, but it kind of turned into nachos.

I would probably cook this again though. I like nachos.

 


 

Hot chocolate.

pexels-photo-228183

Well, I didn’t actually take this picture. It’s a stock photo. But it looks very nice, doesn’t it?

This recipe was pretty short and simple. Just how I like my men.

It calls for 1/3 cup semisweet chocolate pieces, 1/3 cup sugar, 4 cups milk and I added some tiny marshmallows to mine. Makes it feel like fall. Or winter.

The only problem I ran into with this recipe was that it was too hot. But don’t worry, I just waited for it to cool and then I could drink it again.

Overall, I give this recipe 5 stars out of 5 for its simplicity and how good it tastes. It’s way better than hot cocoa mix.

So make some hot chocolate today! Come on. Make some hot chocolate!

Minecraft

This is a dirt hobbit house in the plains biome.

The interior of the dirt house has a mixed textured floor of hay bales and coarse dirt, with a little cobblestone and regular stone tied in.

The backyard has a firepit next to a pond and the back of the house has a chimney and smoke is billowing out into the air, causing pollution probably.

Modern house made of spruce, cobblestone and black stained glass mostly.

House I built underneath a little hill. Along with some lamp posts and my hopper composter.

Oak starter house.

Storage in four directions underground: North, East, South, and West. That way you don’t have to run around from one level to another trying to gather resources.

Dirt starter house

Stone and stripped dark oak mansion, with a car in the carport, and a horse in the front yard.

The front of the remote outpost.

Front of Remote Outpost

The redstone playground.

Redstone Playground

The back of the remote outpost.

Remote Outpost Back

The view from the top of the remote outpost. It’s in the clouds! Wowie.

View From Top of Remote Outpost

Here’s the staircase to the top of the remote outpost tower.

Staircase To The Top

The inside of the remote outpost.

Inside of Remote Outpost

Ice skating rink.

Ice Skating Rink

Guys, I made a floating island. Here is the view from the top.

Overall View

Bottom of the floating island.

Bottom of Floating Island

The poppy stained glass banquet hall from the top of the crazy stairs.

Banquet Hall from Top of Stairs

View from the bottom of the stairs of the F.I. (floating island).

Floating Island from the Bottom

Ok so I made another banquet hall.

Banquet Hall

This side is mostly made of glass. It’s a stained glass poppy. I was going to put the stem but I didn’t make the hall big enough.

Outside Poppy

To the left is my fortress tower, in the middle is the traditional royal hall, and on the right is the banquet hall with the stained glass poppy.

Traditional and Weird

This is the loft. It’s just a loft.

Checkerboard Loft

These are some alternating netherbrick and quartz stairs. Which was terrifying to get.

Alternating Stairs

And this is the stained glass poppy from the interior.

Stained Glass Poppy

Here’s the interior of my second banquet hall:

5

Here’s my banquet hall I got the idea thinking about a quilt:

1

Rainbow stained glass window:

3

I call this side of the hall, “The Elton John.”

2

Rainbow again:

4

Here is my chateau by the beach:

Chateau Front

Bedroom:

Bedroom

Grill and garden. How could we make do without that?

Chateau Grill and Garden

Couch and fireplace. Where’s my hot cocoa?

Couch and Fireplace

What home would be complete without a gaudy fountain?

Fountain

White grand piano:

Grand Piano

Grand staircase:

Grand Staircase

Anybody need a shower?

Shower

The open kitchen for entertaining guests:

Kitchen

The hedge maze:

Maze

Wildflower meadow:

Wildflower Meadow

Here is my fortress. It was a blast to make:

Fortress
Fortified Wall

This is the view from the wall. Can you believe it?

View From Fortified Wall

The on top of the fortified wall:

Fortified Wall Upstairs

Inside the fortified wall:

Inside Fortified Wall

Fortified wall up close:

Fortified Wall Upclose

Here’s a tower too:

Tower Up
Tower Down

My first ever house. The beach house:

Beach House

Be sure to keep all your animals together in one pen.

Pen of Animals

Suspension bridge (well, it’s also a tunnel in 2 places. It’s a Sunnel):

Suspension Bridge Underneath

Suspension bridge with checkerboard pattern. Anyone want to play chess?

Suspension Bridge

This piggie and chicken friend are trapped in my tunnel somehow:

Piggie and Chicken Friend

A Better Four-Year University Education

The Problem

There’s little trust between teacher and student. Students must be disciplined for talking out of turn. Students must sit still for 3 hours while class is ongoing, with a short 10-15 minute break in the middle. Students cannot be trusted to be self-directed. It’s assumed that, if left to their own devices, they would simply flounder without the “structure” of school.

The student is told they must prove what they’ve learned to the authority figure, the instructor. Unfortunately, the way the current system is set up, the main ways you prove you learned is through a paper and pencil test where you fill in bubbles, or maybe write in answers. Or, you write a paper explaining what you learned or make an argument on a limited number of topics to choose from.

This is in contrast to trust.

A college student should be trusted that they want to learn, and in their fourth year synthesis project, they can “prove” their learning much better by applying the knowledge they gathered into an applied-to-life project. Some students will slack or do the bare minimum and just try to get by. But just because there are a few “rotten apples” doesn’t mean you have to treat everyone as if they’re trying to pull a fast one on you. Most people want to do a good job. (source) Especially if they’re adults who are in school by choice. There have been many books written on this subject, and the vast majority of research shows that humans don’t need to be ruled by an iron fist to be productive. In fact, micromanaging people does the opposite; it demoralizes people and makes them less motivated to work hard, or innovate.

Teachers would be better served to be experts in the subjects of their personal choice, as well as educated on how to best teach. There are many brilliant professors who, unfortunately, don’t know how to teach the subjects they are otherwise so brilliant at. Ideally, teachers would have both an equal amount of training in their subject(s) of choice, as well as, in teaching.

The cost of education is currently unaffordable in the U.S. for most of the population. The average cost of attendance is anywhere from $10,000 for a state school, assuming you are a resident of that state, to $36,000 for private education. I don’t know of anyone in my lifetime, who is around my age, who has paid out of pocket, every last penny of their college education. Most get loans, scholarships, grants, and money from their families or state programs, if possible.

The Solution

But what if universities didn’t have to pay for a brick and mortar university? What if universities were a wide network of experts, who had an education in teaching as well, as you could simply drop them a video call when you need them?

For example, if you’re interested in geometry, maybe your university has an expert you can call, who lives in Switzerland, but is affiliated and vetted by the school, and you could arrange a time to talk with them about where you’re stuck with your geometry learning, and the instructor could help you when you need them. Instead of an instructor assigning you homework, books, and tests, they could make suggestions as to which projects would help you learn the subject you’re interested in.

While a video call is inferior to an in-person, one-on-one interaction with an instructor, it is certainly a lot less expensive than the current system of paying sky high tuition, which goes toward not only the staff, but also the buildings, the maintenance of those buildings, and the landscaping.

The buildings and their maintenance alone is 15% of the tuition’s budget. Imagine now, paying 15% less for school. That’s $1,500 off for a state school, and $5,400 for a private institution. The video conference idea doesn’t seem so scary when you think of how much it can save you long term.

This is my four-year plan for a university education.


In the first year, it’s a good time to gain the big picture, such as the theoretical knowledge necessary to understanding what’s out there that you can learn for the foundation of your education. You would be encouraged to pick as many or as few of the first year general subjects as you wish.

This is counter to the traditional system, which forces you to take subjects you will likely never use in your lifetime, and which you will likely forget. A professional dancer doesn’t need to know calculus, and a calculus professor doesn’t need to know how to do ballet. It’s okay not to know everything and to specialize and become the best in your chosen field, because there is a limited amount of time on earth, and learning calculus when you really want to be a ballerina has limited value.

Subjects would be taught all throughout the year, with one week breaks each season, for a total of four weeks off in a year. This is because health psychology studies overwhelmingly have shown taking a vacation, offers tremendous health benefits. (source) Some studies have shown taking a week to de-stress and get away from the troubles of school or work offers health benefits such as lowered cardiovascular disease risk for up to an entire year after the break is taken. These vacations also allow the brain to recharge and be in better performance for the learning that will continue after the break.

1st year (general)

Humanities
Social sciences
Natural sciences
Formal sciences
Applied sciences


In the second year, there would be a new list of subjects that can be learned, based off of the first year’s foundation of knowledge. The student would pick as many or as few subjects as they wish to learn for the second year. This year would be a hybrid of both theoretical and applied education. Students would do less book reading this year, and spend more time working out in the field half the time, applying what they have learned or are learning. For example, say you always dreamed of being a prolific novelist. You might take all the humanities courses, but leave the formal sciences behind.

Then, you might start a concrete, detailed plan for how to begin learning to write well. An expert and teacher on writing could be your resource guide, as well as your consultant. The instructor could direct you to the right places to find a useful book, or maybe to an expert who could assist you in the direction you’re working toward. If the teacher isn’t an expert on writing horror, but knows of someone respected in the field, you could try to contact them. People are busy, but sometimes they are willing to help, and their advice should be treated as invaluable.

2nd yeaR (expanded)

  • Humanities
    • Arts
    • History
    • Home economics
    • Languages and literature
    • Law
    • Philosophy
    • Theology
  • Social sciences
    • Anthropology
    • Economics
    • Geography
    • Political science
    • Psychology
    • Sociology
    • Social work
  • Natural sciences
    • Biology
    • Chemistry
    • Earth science
    • Space sciences
    • Physics
  • Formal sciences
    • Computer science
    • Mathematics
  • Applied Sciences
    • Business
    • Engineering and technology
    • Medicine and health

The third year is for specializing in your chosen field(s) of study. From this list you would gain access to more applied and specific training, such as going to conferences. This is the year you would take instruction and finish writing your plan as to how you are going to write that great novel, or invent that new software, or maybe even come up with a scientific paper to submit to a peer-reviewed journal, depending on your personal interests and values.

3RD YEAR (specialized)

Humanities

  • Arts
    • Performing arts
      • Music
      • Dance
      • Television
      • Theater
      • Film
    • Visual arts
      • Fine arts
      • Applied arts
      • Fashion
  • History
    • African history
    • American history
    • Ancient history
    • Asian history
    • Australian history
    • Ecclesiastical history of the Catholic Church
    • Economic history
    • Environmental history
    • European history
    • Intellectual history
    • Jewish history
    • Latin American history
    • Modern history
    • History of philosophy
    • Political history
    • Pre-Columbian era
    • Russian history
    • History of culture
    • Scientific history
    • Technological history
    • World history
    • Public history
  • Home economics
    • Cooking
    • Cleaning
    • Clothing
    • Family studies
    • Finance
    • Gardening
    • Health
    • Nutrition
  • Languages and literature
    • Linguistics
    • Comparative literature
    • Creative writing
    • English literature
    • History of literature
    • Literary theory
    • Poetry
    • World literature
  • Law
    • Administrative law
    • Canon law
    • Civil law
    • Comparative law
    • Competition law
    • Constitutional law
    • Criminal law
    • Islamic law
    • Jewish law
    • Jurisprudence
    • Legal management
    • Procedural law
    • Substantive law
  • Philosophy
    • Aesthetics
    • Applied philosophy
    • Epistemology
    • Ethics
    • Logic
    • Meta-philosophy
    • Meta-physics
    • Philosophical traditions and schools
    • Social philosophy and political philosophy
  • Theology
    • Biblical studies
    • Religious studies
    • Biblical Hebrew, Greek, and Aramaic
    • Buddhist theology
    • Christian theology
    • Hindu theology
    • Jewish theology
    • Muslim theology

Social sciences

  • Anthropology
  • Biological anthropology
  • Linguistic anthropology
  • Cultural anthropology
  • Social anthropology
  • Archaeology
  • Economics
    • Agricultural economics
    • Anarchist economics
    • Applied economics
    • Behavioral economics
    • Bioeconomics
    • Complexity economics
    • Computational economics
    • Consumer economics
    • Development economics
    • Ecological economics
    • Econometrics
    • Economic geography
    • Economic sociology
    • Economic systems
    • Education economics
    • Energy economics
    • Entrepreneurial economics
    • Environmental economics
    • Evolutionary economics
    • Experimental economics
    • Feminist economics
    • Financial econometrics
    • Financial economics
    • Green economics
    • Growth economics
    • Human development theory
  • Economics (cont.)
    • Industrial organization
    • Information economics
    • Institutional economics
    • International economics
    • Islamic economics
    • Labor economics
    • Law and economics
    • Macroeconomics
    • Managerial economics
    • Marxian economics
    • Mathematical economics
    • Microeconomics
    • Monetary economics
    • Neuroeconomics
    • Participatory economics
    • Political economy
    • Public economics
    • Public finance
    • Real estate economics
    • Resource economics
    • Social choice theory
    • Socialist economics
    • Socioeconomics
    • Transport economics
    • Welfare economics
  • Geography
    • Physical geography
    • Human geography
    • Integrated geography
    • Cartography
  • Political science
    • American politics
    • Canadian politics
    • Civics
    • Comparative politics
    • European studies
    • Geopolitics
    • International relations
    • International organizations
    • Nationalism studies
    • Peace and conflict studies
  • Political science (cont.)
    • Policy studies
    • Political behavior
    • Political culture
    • Political economy
    • Political history
    • Political philosophy
    • Public administration
    • Public law
    • Psephology
    • Social choice theory
  • Psychology
    • Abnormal psychology
    • Applied psychology
    • Biological psychology
    • Clinical neuropsychology
    • Clinical psychology
    • Cognitive psychology
    • Community psychology
    • Comparative psychology
    • Conservation psychology
    • Consumer psychology
    • Criminal psychology
    • Cultural psychology
    • Developmental psychology
    • Differential psychology
    • Ecological psychology
    • Educational psychology
    • Environmental psychology
    • Evolutionary psychology
    • Experimental psychology
    • Group psychology
    • Family psychology
    • Feminine psychology
    • Forensic developmental psychology
    • Forensic psychology
    • Health psychology
    • Humanistic psychology
    • Indigenous psychology
    • Legal psychology
    • Mathematical psychology
    • Media psychology
  • Psychology (cont.)
    • Medical psychology
    • Military psychology
    • Moral psychology and descriptive ethics
    • Music psychology
    • Neuropsychology
    • Occupational health psychology
    • Occupational psychology
    • Organizational psychology
    • Parapsychology
    • Pediatric psychology
    • Pedology
    • Personality psychology
    • Phenomenology
    • Political psychology
    • Positive psychology
    • Psychoanalysis
    • Psychobiology
    • Psychology of religion
    • Psychometrics
    • Psychopathology
    • Psychophysics
    • Quantitative psychology
    • Rehabilitation psychology
    • School psychology
    • Social psychology
    • Sport psychology
    • Traffic psychology
    • Transpersonal psychology
  • Sociology
    • Analytical sociology
    • Applied sociology
    • Architectural sociology
    • Area studies
    • Behavioral sociology
    • Collective behavior
    • Community informatics
    • Comparative sociology
    • Conflict theory
    • Criminology/Criminal justice
    • Critical management studies
    • Critical sociology
    • Cultural sociology
    • Cultural studies
    • Demography/population
    • Digital sociology
    • Dramaturgical sociology
    • Economic sociology
    • Educational sociology
    • Empirical sociology
    • Environmental sociology
    • Evolutionary sociology
    • Feminist sociology
    • Figurational sociology
    • Future studies
    • Gender studies
    • Historical sociology
    • Human ecology
    • Humanistic sociology
    • Industrial sociology
    • Interactionism
    • Interpretive sociology
    • Jealousy sociology
    • Macrosociology
    • Marxist sociology
    • Mathematical sociology
    • Medical sociology
    • Mesosociology
    • Microsociology
    • Military sociology
    • Natural resource sociology
    • Organizational studies
    • Phenomenological sociology
    • Policy sociology
    • Psychoanalytic sociology
    • Science and technology studies
    • Sexology
    • Social capital
    • Social change
    • Social conflict theory
    • Social control
    • Social economy
    • Social philosophy
    • Social policy
    • Social psychology
    • Social stratification
    • Social theory
    • Social transformation
    • Sociobiology
    • Sociocybernetics
    • Sociolinguistics
  • Sociology (cont.)
    • Sociology of aging
    • Sociology of agriculture
    • Sociology of art
    • Sociology of autism
    • Sociology of childhood
    • Sociology of conflict
    • Sociology of culture
    • Sociology of cyberspace
    • Sociology of development
    • Sociology of deviance
    • Sociology of disaster
    • Sociology of education
    • Sociology of emotions
    • Sociology of fatherhood
    • Sociology of finance
    • Sociology of food
    • Sociology of gender
    • Sociology of generations
    • Sociology of globalization
    • Sociology of government
    • Sociology of health and illness
    • Sociology of human consciousness
    • Sociology of immigration
    • Sociology of knowledge
    • Sociology of language
    • Sociology of law
    • Sociology of leisure
    • Sociology of markets
    • Sociology of marriage
    • Sociology of motherhood
    • Sociology of music
    • Sociology of natural resources
    • Sociology of organizations
    • Sociology of peace, war, and social conflict
    • Sociology of punishment
    • Sociology of race and ethnic relations
    • Sociology of religion
    • Sociology of risk
    • Sociology of science
    • Sociology of scientific knowledge
    • Sociology of social change
    • Sociology of social movements
    • Sociology of space
    • Sociology of sport
    • Sociology of technology
    • Sociology of terrorism
    • Sociology of the body
    • Sociology of the family
    • Sociology of the history of science
    • Sociology of the internet
    • Sociology of work
    • Sociomusicology
    • Structural sociology
    • Theoretical sociology
    • Urban/rural sociology
    • Victimology
    • Visual sociology
  • Social work
    • Clinical social work
    • Community practice
    • Mental health
    • Psychosocial rehabilitation
    • Person-centered therapy
    • Family therapy
    • Financial social work

Natural sciences

  • Biology
    • Aerobiology
    • Anatomy
    • Biochemistry
    • Bioinformatics
    • Biophysics
    • Biotechnology
    • Botany
    • Cell biology
    • Chronobiology
    • Computational biology
    • Cryobiology
    • Developmental biology
    • Ecology
    • Endocrinology
    • Evolutionary biology
    • Genetics
    • Histology
    • Human biology
    • Immunology
  • Biology (cont.)
    • Linology
    • Linnaean taxonomy
    • Marine biology
    • Mathematical biology
    • Microbiology
    • Molecular biology
    • Mycology
    • Neuroscience
    • Nutrition
    • Paleobiology
    • Parasitology
    • Pathology
    • Physiology
    • Structural biology
    • Systematics
    • Systems biology
    • Virology
    • Xenobiology
    • Zoology
  • Chemistry
    • Agrochemistry
    • Analytical chemistry
    • Astrochemistry
    • Atmospheric chemistry
    • Biochemistry (outline)
    • Chemical biology
    • Chemical engineering (outline)
    • Cheminformatics
    • Computational chemistry
    • Cosmochemistry
    • Electrochemistry
    • Environmental chemistry
    • Femtochemistry
    • Flavor
    • Flow chemistry
    • Geochemistry
    • Green chemistry
    • Histochemistry
    • Hydrogenation
    • Immunochemistry
    • Inorganic chemistry
    • Marine chemistry
    • Mathematical chemistry
    • Mechanochemistry
    • Medicinal chemistry
  • Chemistry (cont.)
    • Molecular biology
    • Molecular mechanics
    • Nanotechnology
    • Natural product chemistry
    • Neurochemistry
    • Oenology
    • Organic chemistry (outline)
    • Organometallic chemistry
    • Petrochemistry
    • Pharmacology
    • Photochemistry
    • Physical chemistry
    • Physical organic chemistry
    • Phytochemistry
    • Polymer chemistry
    • Quantum chemistry
    • Radiochemistry
    • Solid-state chemistry
    • Sonochemistry
    • Supramolecular chemistry
    • Surface chemistry
    • Synthetic chemistry
    • Theoretical chemistry
    • Thermochemistry
  • Earth science
    • Edaphology
    • Environmental chemistry
    • Environmental science
    • Gemology
    • Geochemistry
    • Geodesy
    • Physical geography
    • Geophysics
    • Paleontology
  • Space sciences
    • Astrobiology
    • Astronomy
    • Astrophysics
    • Interstellar medium
    • Numerical simulations
    • Physical cosmology
    • Stellar astrophysics
    • Planetary science
  • Physics
    • Acoustics
    • Aerodynamics
    • Applied physics
    • Astrophysics
    • Atomic, molecular, and optical physics
    • Biophysics
    • Computational physics
    • Condensed matter physics
    • Cryogenics
    • Electricity
    • Electromagnetism
    • Elementary particle physics
    • Experimental physics
    • Fluid dynamics
    • Geophysics
  • Physics (cont.)
    • Mathematical physics
    • Mechanics
    • Medical physics
    • Molecular physics
    • Newtonian dynamics
    • Nuclear physics
    • Optics
    • Plasma physics
    • Quantum physics
    • Solid mechanics
    • Solid state physics
    • Statistical mechanics
    • Theoretical physics
    • Thermal physics
    • Thermodynamics

Formal sciences

  • Computer science
    • Logic in computer science
    • Algorithms
    • Artificial intelligence
    • Data structures
    • Computer architecture
    • Computer graphics
    • Computer communications
    • Computer security and reliability
    • Computing in mathematics, natural sciences, engineering, and medicine
  • Computer science (cont.)
    • Computing in social sciences, arts, humanities, and professions
    • Distributed computing
    • Human-computer interaction
    • Operating systems
    • Parallel computing
    • Programming languages
    • Quantum computing
    • Software engineering
    • Theory of computation
    • VLSI design

Mathematics

  • Pure mathematics
    • Mathematical logic and foundations of mathematics
    • Algebra
    • Analysis
    • Probability theory
    • Geometry
    • Number theory
  • Applied mathematics
    • Approximation theory
    • Combinatorics
    • Cryptography
    • Dynamical systems
    • Game theory
    • Graph theory
    • Information theory
    • Mathematical physics
    • Numerical analysis
    • Operations research
    • Statistics
    • Theory of computation

Applied sciences

Business

  • Accounting
  • Business management
  • Finance
  • Marketing
  • Operations management

Engineering and technology

  • Chemical engineering
    • Bioengineering
    • Catalysis
    • Materials engineering
    • Molecular engineering
    • Nanotechnology
    • Polymer engineering
    • Process design
    • Process engineering
    • Reaction engineering
    • Thermodynamics
    • Transport phenomena
  • Civil engineering
    • Coastal engineering
    • Earthquake engineering
    • Ecological engineering
    • Environmental engineering
    • Geotechnical engineering
    • Hydraulic engineering
    • Mining engineering
    • Transportation engineering
    • Structural engineering
    • Structural mechanics
    • Surveying
  • Educational technology
    • Instructional design
    • Human performance technology
    • Knowledge management
  • Electrical engineering
    • Applied physics
    • Computer engineering
    • Computer science
    • Control systems engineering
    • Electronic engineering
    • Engineering physics
    • Information theory
    • Mechantronics
    • Power engineering
    • Quantum computing
    • Robotics
    • Semiconductors
    • Telecommunications engineering
  • Materials science and engineering
    • Biomaterials
    • Ceramic engineering
    • Crystallography
    • Nanomaterials
    • Photonics
    • Physical metallurgy
    • Polymer engineering
    • Polymer science
    • Semiconductors
  • Mechanical engineering
    • Aerospace engineering
    • Acoustical engineering
    • Automotive engineering
    • Biomedical engineering
    • Continuum mechanics
    • Fluid mechanics
    • Heat transfer
    • Industrial engineering
    • Manufacturing engineering
    • Marine engineering
    • Mass transfer
    • Mechatronics
    • Nanoengineering
    • Ocean engineering
    • Optical engineering
    • Robotics
    • Thermodynamics
  • Systems science
    • Chaos theory
    • Complex systems
    • Conceptual systems
    • Control theory
    • Cybernetics
    • Network science
    • Operations research
    • Systems biology
    • System dynamics
    • Systems ecology
    • Systems engineering
    • Systems psychology
    • Systems theory
    • Systems theory in anthropology

Medicine and health

  • Alternative medicine
  • Audiology
  • Clinical laboratory sciences
  • Clinical physiology
  • Dentistry
  • Dermatology
  • Emergency medicine
  • Epidemiology
  • Geriatrics
  • Gynaecology
  • Health informatics
  • Hematology
  • Infectious disease
  • Intensive care medicine
  • Internal medicine
  • Medical toxiocology
  • Music therapy
  • Nursing
  • Nutrition
  • Obstetrics
  • Occupational hygiene
  • Occupational therapy
  • Occupational toxicology
  • Ophthalmology
  • Optometry
  • Otolaryngology
  • Pathology
  • Pediatrics
  • Pharmaceutical sciences
  • Physical fitness
  • Physical therapy
  • Physiotherapy
  • Podiatry
  • Preventative medicine
  • Primary care
  • Psychiatry
  • Psychology
  • Public health
  • Radiology
  • Recreational therapy
  • Rehabilitation medicine
  • Respiratory medicine
  • Sleep medicine
  • Speech-language pathology
  • Sports medicine
  • Surgery
  • Traditional medicine
  • Urology
  • Veterinary medicine

4TH YEAR (synthesized)

Fourth year is your final synthesis of everything you learned. The last year, you wrote your bucket list of things you want to accomplish in your lifetime. This is the year to actually work toward those bucket list items.

For example, if your goal is to learn a foreign language, maybe you go to Japan and stay there for a year to immerse yourself in the language and culture. Maybe your goal is to make friends while you’re there and actively practice everything you learned about the Japanese language in your studies over the last three years.

For some people, this isn’t financially feasible, but that doesn’t mean you can never cross off any of those bucket list items. You could make a website based on your learning to share with others. You could build your own greenhouse and sell your plants. You could audition for a play in the city or a community theater. There are lots of options, and not all of them have to be expensive.

The final year is supposed to be about accomplishing what you set out to accomplish in your life, not just pay a fortune to get a better paying, more prestigious job.

College could be a place that’s more than that. It could be a place to accomplish your dreams.

References

Leah Wortham et al., Autonomy-Mastery-Purpose: Structuring Clinical Courses to Enhance these Critical
Goals, 17 INT’L J. CLINICAL LEGAL EDUC., no. 2, 2012, at 105.

Marz, J., Petrie, N., & Boyes, A. (2020, July 14). The data-driven case for vacation. Retrieved March 12, 2021, from https://hbr.org/2016/07/the-data-driven-case-for-vacation